DOUGLAS A-20 HAVOC

 

The Douglas A-20 Havoc was a an early US attack, light bomber, intruder, and reconnaissance aircraft of WWII and although not the fastest or longest-range aircraft in its class, proved to be a tough and dependable combat aircraft with an excellent reputation for speed and manoeuvrability.

With a crew of 3 - consisting of pilot, observer and navigator, the majority of Havocs served with the Soviets against the German invasion, with the next biggest operator being the USAAF, followed by Great Britain and Australia.

Also known as the DB-7 (Douglas Bomber 7) and as the Boston to the British, the A-20 was originally commissioned for the French airforce who placed a large order with the Douglas factory in 1938. After the fall of France a substantial number were still awaiting export so instead, they were delivered to the British which used them for night-fighters as well as a low-level ground/sea attack roles in the Mediterranean and North Africa 

The Havoc A-20 was easy to fly with good handling characteristics during takeoff and landing, with light handling during high-speed flight. The tricycle landing gear made takeoff, landing and ground handling very simple and pilots were able to fly it with a minimum of instructions.  

In early 1944, 312th and 417th Bombardment Groups were sent to New Guinea, equipped with A-20Gs. Most sorties were flown at low level, as Japanese flak was not as deadly as German flak, and it was soon found that there was little need for a bomb aimer. 

Consequently, the bomb aimer was replaced by additional machine guns mounted in a faired-over nose. A-20Gs were an ideal weapon for pinpoint strikes against aircraft, hangars, and supply dumps. When operating in formation their heavy forward firepower could overwhelm shipboard anti-aircraft defences and at low level they could skip their bombs into the sides of transports and destroyers with deadly effect.

No. 22 Squadron of the Royal Australian Air Force been operating A-20’s against the Japanese from Port Moresby in PNG since Nov 1942 but after suffering their worst loss of 13 aircraft on the ground from a surprise Japanese raid at Morotai on November 23, 1944, the squadron was reequipped with the Bristol Beaufighter with the surviving A-20’s relegated to transport, mail delivery and communications.

With the end of the New Guinea campaign the A-20s squadrons moved to the Philippines and in 1944 three full attack squadrons of A-20’s were active in the campaign that led to the invasion of Luzon. After the Philippines were secured, A-20s started attacks on Japanese targets in Formosa.

By the end of the war, over 7478 A-20 and their variants had been built with almost a third going to the Soviets.

All Douglas A-20 Havoc Instruments listed below come complete with detailed Scale Model, Mango Wood Stand & Plaque plus Printed Fact Sheet featuring photo of instrument in aircraft cockpit.

Return to VINTAGE ORIGINAL AIRCRAFT INSTRUMENTS

  • DOUGLAS A-20 HAVOC COOLANT TEMP GAUGE

    Rare Douglas A-20 Havoc Weston Electric Inst Corp 115412 T-52H,...

    $520.00
  • DOUGLAS A-20 HAVOC AN3771-1 WWII FUEL PRESSURE GAUGE

    1943 issued AN 5771-1 Douglas A-20 Havoc Fuel Pressure Gauge

    $620.00
  • DOUGLAS A-20 HAVOC WWII PARKER 401-2A MANUAL FUEL PRIMER

    Fantastic WWII Douglas A-20 Havoc fully working Parker manual fuel...

    $750.00